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To help students interested in international and global issues find classes that are often scattered across campus, Global Studies has compiled the following list of UW-Madison courses with global content.

Submit a course for inclusion here.

 

Anthropology and International Health
Instructor: Claire Wendland
Anthropology 919 section 1; 2 cr; call number: 66824
Class meets: T 5:30 - 7:10pm
There is no required discussion section.
This course is suitable for graduate students.

This seminar uses case studies from many parts of the world to identify and interrogate the methods used by medical anthropologists who seek to understand health problems and to strengthen the design of health interventions. We also attend to critiques of the institutions and discourses of global health. Students from all disciplines will come away with a better understanding of current issues in public health globally, including in the United States, and of the contributions anthropological research makes to our understanding of those issues.

Prerequisites (if any): None.

Anthropology of Reproduction
Instructor: Claire Wendland
Anthropology 490 section 003; 3 cr; call number: 73744
Class meets: M 9:00 - 11:30am
There is no required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

How do people reproduce (or change) society in the process of reproducing biologically? In this capstone course we will address problems of culture, society, and globalization that are revealed through reproduction. While our approach will be interdisciplinary, we will draw most heavily on the work of anthropologists.

Prerequisites (if any): Juniors or senior standing; anthropology majors have first priority for enrollment.

(The) Catholic Church and the World
Instructor: Giulian Chamedes
History 201 section 001; 3 cr; call number: 73626
Class meets: R 3:30 - 5:25pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

Current affairs attests to the power of religion in shaping international politics. Right now, all eyes are turned to political Islam. But in recent history, political Christianity and the Catholic Church also transformed global politics, social networks, and the world-views of millions of people. This course develops a framework for analysis, delving into how, and why, the Catholic Church gained new political and social power in the 20th century, and how it expanded its reach beyond its native Rome to regions in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Topics covered include the Catholic Church's changing stance on democracy; anti-Semitism and ecumenism; gender politics; and economic development. As a COMM B course, we will also be working on refining your skills as keen analysts, forceful writers, and confident public speakers.

Prerequisites (if any): Comm A or equivalent.

(The) Challenge of Democratization
Instructor: Christina Ewig
Political Science 505; 4 cr; call number: 73383, 73384, 73385
Class meets: MW 4:00 - 5:15pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Understanding the causes of regime change is a long-standing, central concern of comparative political science. It is also a major concern of policy makers in the US government and elsewhere who specifically look to scholars for answers to these questions. This course provides students with the background and tools to understand contemporary theories of democratization, and gives students the opportunity put theory into practice with assignments that ask students to analyze of the status of democracy and the potential for democracy in particular countries. We begin the course with the foundational task of defining democracy. We then explore what we think we know about the factors and processes behind democratization, reviewing the major theories of democratization. We then broaden the focus to the study of democratic consolidation, the rise of hybrid forms of democracy and quality of democracy. Our theoretical discussions will be grounded in understanding democratization in Western Europe, Latin America, the countries of the former Soviet Union, Africa, and the Middle East.

Prerequisites: None.

Cities & Development
Instructor: Kris Olds
Geography 900; 3 cr; call number: 75872
Class meets: F 9:00 - 11:30am
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for graduate students.

This course examines the relationship between cities and the 'development' process (broadly defined). Global scale assessments of urbanization processes lay the context for detailed analyses of issues such as the role of the state in the development process, the relationship between cities and citizenship, postcolonial urbanism, transnational urbanism, city futures, and urban development for the 'knowledge-based' economy. While these are long-standing issues of debate in various disciplines, and in interdisciplinary networks, our interest will be in recent work (primarily single-authored books) that addresses new theoretical, methodological and empirical questions, or else select "classics" that have had lasting impacts. We will also examine the institutional contexts in which our assigned authors have been embedded so as to better understand the uneven and sometime serendipitous production of knowledge about cities. More at https://citiesanddevelopment.wordpress.com/.

Prerequisites: None.

Cities of Asia
Instructor: Preeti Chopra
Art History (CL Languages & Cultures of Asia) 379; 3 cr; call number: 64534
Class meets: TR 1:00 - 2:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

This semester long survey course, presents a historical overview of the built environment of the cities of Asia from antiquity to the present. Most surveys of the city focus on the West, even though the earliest neolithic settlements are found in western Asia, and the first true cities were constructed between the Tigris and Euphrates around 3500 B.C. Max Weber's work on the City was influential in drawing a contrast between Western and non-Western cities, arguing that 'urban communities' and hence 'true cities' were only found in the West. This course seeks does not seek to essentialize Western or non-Western cities. Instead, it seeks to explore and tease out common themes that thread through the diverse geographical regions and cultures of Asia. The aim of this course is to examine the architectural and urban legacy of the past and present in its social and historical context. In this course, we will look at the rise of cities in Asia, study the influence of Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman planning traditions on their colonies in Asia, examine debates surrounding the Islamic city, explore the role of religious ideas and practices in shaping the city, and discuss the relationship between sovereign power and the city. We will then move on to see the ways in which colonial ideologies were used to reshape existing cities and build new ones. In the postcolonial context, this course will analyze the rise of nationalism and the influence of western architects and planners such as Le Corbusier and Louis Kahn in introducing "modernization" and shaping a vision of architecture and urbanism appropriate to the newly independent states of Asia. As the world becomes increasingly integrated into a global network, we see the emergence of world cities in Asia. At the same, a large majority of the population in many Asian cities lives in slums. Are these spaces of despair or can they also be seen as vibrant settlements? We will look at both the origins of cities and their transformation over time, and examine the physical city in order to understand the texture of urban life.

Prerequisites: None.

China in World Politics
Instructor: Edward Friedman
Political Science 346; 3 cr; call number: 65052, 73448-73450
Class meets: W 2:30 - 3:45pm
There is an optional discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

How China rose after the death of Mao and how that rise has changed the world. The opportunities and challenges brought by this economic superpower China in all the diverse regions of the world.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Climatic Environments of the Past
Instructor: Jack Williams
Geography 331 section 01; 3 cr; call number: 64423
Class meets: TR 11:00am - 12:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

This class focuses on global climatic changes during the Quaternary Period, which encompasses the last 2.6 million years, includes the rise of human civilizations, and extends to the present day. Climatically, the defining characteristics of the Quaternary are 1) regular cycles between glacial and interglacial periods and 2) abrupt shifts in the state of the climate system. Understanding the sources and causes of past climatic variability is a necessary precondition to making informed projections of future climate changes and impacts. The field is changing rapidly and new discoveries appear every week.

Prerequisites: No required prerequisite. Recommended that students take Geog/IES 120, Geog/IES 127, AOS 100, or similar course.

Comparative Politics of Sport
Instructor: Michael Schatzberg
Political Science 616; 3 cr; call number: 73387
Class meets: MW 4:00 - 5:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

One goal of this course is to begin a comparative and multinational exploration of the politics of sport that examines the intersections of sports and politics. A second goal is to encourage all of us to think about politics, and sports, in new and different ways. The political-economy, political culture, and the political sociology of sport, as well as the many and varied intersections of politics and sport in various corners of the globe will be the subject of our collective discussions. In doing so, a third goal of the course will be to sharpen the analytic skills of the students.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

Comparative Study of Genocide
Instructor: Scott Straus
Political Science/International Studies 318 section all; 4 cr; call number: 74091-74101
Class meets: T 11:00am - 12:15pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

How and why genocide occurs in the world?

Prerequisites: None.

Contemporary Political Discourse: The Rhetoric of Modern Democratic Revolutions
Instructor: Mary McCoy
Communication Arts 470 section 01; 3 cr; call number: 75855
Class meets: TR 1:00 - 2:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

This course will explore the ideas and rhetoric of the democratic mass movements that have played a defining role in the making of our modern world, examining the imagery, speeches and symbolic actions shared by democratic revolutions on five continents over the span of a century. Taking a comparative approach, it will trace links from Gandhi's influence on Martin Luther King, Jr., to the impact of the US Civil Rights Movement on the 'people power' revolutions of the past three decades, ending with the recent uprisings in the Arab world and new social movements at home. In pursuit of this inquiry, the course will examine a range of political discourse, from the soaring speeches of key leaders to pivotal acts of defiance. Class discussions will study their mobilizing impact in each movement as well as the power of iconic moments to inspire similar actions elsewhere in the world. The course will also allow students to study the role of different media in transforming publics and counter-publics within and outside democratic movements. Finally, it will help students begin to look critically at the role of different forms of rhetoric in driving or derailing popular movements to help make sense of successes, failures, and transformations that otherwise defy easy assessment.

Prerequisites: Junior status and above.

Contentious Politics
Instructor: Erica Simmons
Political Science/International Studies 667 section 1; 4 cr; call number: 76057-76059
Class meets: TR 2:30 - 3:45pm
There is an optional discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

What explains when, where, and why people come together to engage in acts of political protest? How do we understand the emergence and growth of social movements? Of political upheavals dramatic enough to be understood as revolutions? What explains when grievances foment riots and when they motivate long-term movements for social change? As recent events in the Middle East show, it is difficult to understand politics without taking a careful look at moments when people organize outside of established political institutions to demand change. Through readings, lectures, discussion, and films, this course will introduce students to the main theoretical and empirical themes in the study of contentious politics. We will focus on social movements, revolutions, and riots, addressing both the theoretical literature and specific case studies. The course will touch on a number of 20th century social movements and revolutions but will focus specifically on the U.S. civil rights movement, the 1989 student movement in China, the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, The Iranian Revolution, and the Arab Uprising.

Prerequisites: None.

Development and Environment in Southeast Asia
Instructor: Ian Baird
Geography/Environmental Studies 557; 3 cr; call number: 74474
Class meets: TR 1:00 - 2:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Mainland Southeast Asia has experienced considerable economic growth in recent decades, and while the socio-economic conditions of much of the region's population have materially improved, economic development has come at a cost—some would argue a very high cost—and has certainly been uneven. Many countries are facing a range of worsening environmental and social problems, and the wealth gap between the rich and poor has steadily widened and shows no signs of narrowing. Often, the interests of governments, large corporations, and urban business people have come into conflict with those of farmers, fishers, indigenous peoples and other rural peoples who are heavily reliant on natural resources for their livelihoods. Taking a critical but balanced approach, this course examines the complex relationships between the political economy, environment, and society in mainland Southeast Asia. Drawing on a wide variety of case study material from different parts of the region, and covering various theoretical perspectives, the course will be especially focused on the poorer nations, often referred to as 'developing countries'. However, the relationship between richer and poorer nations, and the challenges facing both, will be discussed. But to a large extent this course covers what might be called 'Third World Political Ecology', with a regional focus on Southeast Asia. Political ecology is a widely expanding inter-disciplinary field that is usually conceptualized as combining political economy with ecological approaches. In addition, political ecology has become increasingly attentive to discourse analysis, geopolitics, history and socio-cultural issues.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Early Modern Objects and Their Histories
Instructor: Lee Palmer Wandel
History 600 section 6; 3 cr; call number: 73776
Class meets: T 1:20 - 3:15pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

In the early modern world, things feathers, shells, rugs, porcelain, dyes, glazes, wood, stone, plants traveled as never before, and Europeans collected them, first in curiosity cabinets and then in museums. We shall begin with cabinets of curiosity and the movement of things. Each student in this seminar will then choose a specific object from the early modern world; research where it came from, its production (if a made object), and circulation; and explore its meanings and/or values in changing contexts. Each student will be required to write a 25-page research paper on an object, its history, and its meanings and values in the early modern world.

Prerequisites: None.

Environmental Biogeography
Instructor: Erika Marin-Spiotta
Geography/Botany 338; 3 cr; call number: 64424
Class meets: MW 2:30 - 3:45pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

This course fulfills the Biological Science breadth requirement. This course takes an ecosystems approach to understand how physical (climate, geology, soils) and biological (competition, dispersal, evolution, extinction) factors affect the spatial and temporal distribution of terrestrial biomes, ecosystems and biodiversity. We will discuss the role of disturbance and especially anthropogenic factors (recent climate change, land-use change, invasions) on species distributions, including disease. The course goals are: (1) To learn patterns and mechanisms of local to global gene, species, ecosystem and biome distributions; (2) To learn how humans affect geographic patterns of biodiversity; (3) To learn how to apply concepts from biogeography to current environmental problems; (4) To learn important events and authors in the history of biogeographic study and (5) To learn how to read and interpret the primary literature, that is, scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals.

Prerequisites: None.

Environmental Conservation
Instructor: Matt Turner
Geography/Environmental Studies 339; 4 cr; call number: 57746-57748, 62169-62171, 67901-67902, 75869
Class meets: MW 2:30 - 3:45pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

In this course we study environmental conservation from a geographical perspective reviewing the biophysical, institutional, and socioeconomic dimensions of environmental problems in order to develop more effective conservation solutions. Environmental conservation is itself a social process. Thus we pay careful attention to how changes in values, scientific understandings of nature, economy and politics affect conservation practice. Not only will we trace the major debates in environmental conservation but we will also explore how differences in people's biophysical, economic and political surroundings have led to different perceptions of environmental problems and their solutions.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

(The) First Islamic Empire
Instructor: Michael Chamberlain
History 225 section 001; 3 cr; call number: 66091
Class meets: TR 1:00 - 12:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

The Arab conquests of the seventh-century CE are often treated as a decisive break in the history of the Middle East, one that divides study of the region into the firm categories of the “ancient” and “Islamic”. The Islamic empires that followed the conquests are usually treated more as Islamic than imperial developments. This class, asking how the Arab conquest of the East Roman and Sasanian empires in resulted in a new universal empire, will question the notion of a clean break. Rather than taking the period immediately prior to the rise of Islam as our starting point, we will seek out long- term continuities in the history of the region, especially those relating to the appearance and historical development of the universal cosmopolitan empire.

Prerequisites (if any): Sophomore standing.

Global Physical Environments
Instructor: John Williams and Erika Marin-Spiotta
Geography 120; 3 cr; call number
: check course guide
Class meets: MW 11:00 - 11:50pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

The Earth is the place where we live, the water that we drink, the air that we breathe, and the home to all known life in the universe. The earth is a system, composed of many interacting subsystems: the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, geosphere, and anthrosphere. The earth is dynamic. We live in a swiftly changing world, characterized by rapidly changing climates, shifting landscapes, and growing human populations. Now, more than ever, it’s essential to understand how the Earth system works, how it affects our livelihoods, and how we are altering the physical environment of our planet. Geography/IES 120 provides a critical foundation for students by introducing them to how the Earth system works and what makes Earth livable. Through this course you will gain a deeper appreciation for the diverse processes that shape our local, regional and global landscapes. Many students take this course to fulfill their physical science requirement. Others use it as a gateway to majors and careers in Geography, Environmental Studies, and Environmental Science.

Prerequisites: None.

Global Social Problems
Instructor: Gay Seidman
Sociology 236; 3 cr; call number: 76280
Class meets: MW 2:30 - 3:45pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

This class will explore global social issues, with an emphasis on challenges facing developing regions. In working through some contemporary debates – from how to deal with urban poverty, to the drivers of global immigration, to explanations for the recent ebola epidemic - we will explore some of the larger dynamics shaping our world today, from interactions between the changing global economy, historical legacies, and the structure of international institutions, to policy debates about public health, environmental challenges and social inequality.

Prerequisites: None.

Globalization and Linguistic Human Rights in Education
Instructor: Francois Victor Tochon
Curriculum & Instruction 764; 3 cr; call number: 74855
Class meets: T 12:30 - 3:00pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for graduate students.

Throughout history, languages have been linked to political power. Globalization affects languages and cultures. Languages are constantly changing. Global policies accelerate the trend. Multilingual situations are increasingly problematic. Half of the world languages may disappear within two decades. Linguistic genocide and linguicism partly explain this phenomenon: Linguistic genocide is doing mental and physical harm to a minority population in transferring its children to the majority, "prohibiting the use of the language of the group in daily intercourse or in schools, or the printing and circulation of publications in the language of the group". This definition comes from the original Article III(1) of the final draft of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (E 794, 1948) of the United Nations. Linguicism refers to ideologies, structures, and practices that are used to legitimate, create, regulate, and reproduce an unequal division of power and resources (both concrete and abstract) between groups that are defined on the basis of language (Skutnabb-Kangas). Colonial representations of [superior] Self and [inferior] Other involving race, gender, ethnicity, class, and language, are constantly re/constructed in curricula, policies and practices related with foreign languages. The seminar will discuss teaching in a global society, the manifestation of linguicism and cross-cultural clashes, language curricula and linguistic human rights. We will inquire into their implications through current research approaches and theorize their impact on curriculum and instruction.

Prerequisites: Interest in exploring language education policies in one particular country or set of countries. See http://www.languageeducationpolicy.org.

Introduction to Human Geography: Geographies of Global Change
Instructor: Robert Kaiser
Geography 101 section 01; 4 cr; call number:
check course guide
Class meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45am
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the field of human geography by exploring the spatial patterns and processes of global change. To do this, we will systematically explore the relation between space and social life associated with globalization through the use of a series of human geographic 'lenses', including: economic geography, social and cultural geography, population geography, environmental geography, urban geography and political geography/geopolitics.

Prerequisites: None. This course satisfies Communications B requirements.

Introduction to International Studies
Instructor: Erica Simmons
International Studies 101; 4 cr; call numbers:
check course guide
Class meets: TR 11:00am - 12:15pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

Familiarizes students with the field of international studies, and performs an interdisciplinary examination of the cultural, political, economic, and social patterns that have defined the modern world.

Prerequisites: None.

(The) Making of Modern Europe
Instructor: Lee Palmer Wandel
History 119 section 1; 4 cr; call number: 61956-61958, 66752
Class meets: TR 8:00 - 9:15am
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

This course introduces students to the cultural, intellectual, social, political, and economic changes in Europe between 1492 and 1815. We shall explore changes in the understanding of the human person both body and mind and of the universe; the repercussions of a global economy for different groups in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia; the articulation of new forms of political power and economic organization; and the emergence of the modern sense of self.

Prerequisites: None.

(The) Making of the Islamic World: The Middle East, 500-1500
Instructor: Michael Chamberlain
History 205 section 001; 3 cr; call number: 63892
Class meets: TR 4:00 - 5:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

History 205 covers a 750 year period stretching from Morocco to Central Asia. The period and place are so large, and the peoples concerned so diverse, as to beg the question how we might possibly do any of it justice in fifteen. Moreover, we will not concentrate on a single aspect of the region’s historical experience, politics or religion say, but at a larger and to my mind more important issue: the interconnections of everything on which evidence has survived that played a role in large-scale historical change. These will include the region’s physical environment, human ecology, politics, social life culture, economy, technology, and religion, all of which we will be studying in some detail.

Prerequisites (if any): None.

Nature, Power and Society
Instructor: Ian Baird
Geography/Environmental Studies 337; 3 cr; call number: 66674
Class meets: TR 1:00 - 2:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

This course provides an introduction to many important issues and key concepts associated with people and resources, or nature and society. In this course we will examine some of the most crucial ecological and natural resource management problems. We will, however, not only consider the biological and ecological factors - as important as they frequently are - but also the social, cultural and political elements associated with them, including issues associated with power. The objective of the course is to inspire people to take the ecological and natural resource management challenges seriously, but also to encourage critical thinking, which is necessary for ensuring good analysis. By the end of the course, students should have a good general understanding of the key elements that link nature, power and society.

Prerequisites (if any): Sophomore standing.

Resources and People
Instructor: Morgan Robertson
Geography 139; 3 cr; call number: 65172-65175, 67448-67451
Class meets: MW 2:25 - 3:15pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

This course is an introductory survey of the environmental problems and challenges that face us as we enter the "Anthropocene" - the age in which human actions play as much of a role in "how the earth works" in terms of climate and geology. Not only will we cover a number of the environmental and resource challenges that we face in the Anthropocene, we will focus on how geographers understand these problems. Geography, as a discipline, is often better-suited to complex social and environmental problems because geographers do not separate human from environmental factors, but believe they should be analyzed together - this gives geography a more integrated perspective than, say, political science, economics, or ecology. By the end of this course you will have not only an operational understanding of the environmental processes that lead to climate change, desertification, deforestation, water quality impacts, and toxic hazards, but also of the political and social context in which these environmental issues are discussed, debated, and perhaps resolved.

Prerequisites (if any): None.

Sociology of Developing Societies
Instructor: Gay Seidman
Sociology 630; 3 cr; call number: 65307
Class meets: TR 11:00am - 12:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

This course introduces some key themes in the sociology of development, beginning with an overview of major theoretical frameworks, and then moving into a variety of debates in the field, from the impact of globalization, to changing social movements and transnational activism, to the politics of development aid.

Prerequisites: None.

(The) Soviet Union and the World, 1917-1991
Instructor: Francine Hirsch
History 424 section 001; 4 cr; call number: 73736, 73738, 73822-73825
Class meets: TR 11:00am - 12:15pm
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

Surveys Soviet foreign relations from 1917-1991, examining the causes, course, and outcome of the Cold War. Topics include: Soviet-US relations, World War II, the Socialist Bloc, espionage, the space race, Sino-Soviet relations, and Soviet intervention in the 'Third World.'

Prerequisites (if any): Sophomore standing.

Taste
Instructor: Preeti Chopra
Art History (CL Design Studies) 642; 3 cr; call number: 75735
Class meets: R 4:15 - 6:15pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for both graduate and undergraduate students.

This seminar will explore the idea of taste – both "good" and "bad", in "popular" and "high" culture – drawing on material from the United States, Europe, and South Asia. Taste has at least two meanings, both of which concern the faculty of perception. The first, an older meaning, is used in a physical sense to convey the sensation caused in the mouth when it comes in contact with a flavor, or a small sample of food. The second meaning is obtained from developments in intellectual culture deriving from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, when the word became increasingly important and complex. The second meaning of taste went beyond simple liking or preference for something, to include the notion of discrimination. Here, the ability to distinguish between something that was beautiful, ugly, or merely pleasant, was an attribute of someone that exhibited "good taste." However, both the words tasteful and tasteless emerged during the same period. So who decides what constitutes "good" taste or "bad" taste? There is no escaping from matters of taste – we judge others and are judged on the basis of our individual tastes. In our everyday actions, each one of us is seen as a consumer exercising our personal taste, our purely subjective preferences, in the choices we make, from the art and movies we view, or the books we read, to the clothes we wear, and the food we eat. But is taste personal or collective? We all know that taste is shared in a particular period and place, such as the "Victorian" taste that dominated late-nineteenth century Britain. And yet, even as we might conform to publicly sanctioned attitudes about certain styles, we still assert our individual preferences. Do we belong to particular taste cultures and taste publics? What is the relationship between taste and shared institutions and spaces that are supposed to represent the public? Whose tastes are considered and whose are not? Who should decide? How should decisions be made? In this seminar, we will read both historical and theoretical works on the idea of taste, and examine works of architecture, landscape, art, articles of clothing, and public space. The readings will be drawn from a wide range of disciplines including architectural, and art history, anthropology, sociology, and material culture.

Prerequisites (if any): None.

Travel Writing as Historical Sources
Instructor: Pernille Ipsen
History 201 section 002; 3 cr; call number: 73668-73670
Class meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45am
There is a required discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

Early Modern European explorers, colonists, and travelers often men with little or no knowledge of the lands and peoples they were encountering wrote many and long fascinating accounts of their travels, filled both with exotic tales and with hyper-specific useful knowledge sought after by European colonial and trading companies. Historians have found a variety of ways to employ these complicated and important historical sources, which therefore offer a perfect place to start broaching questions about historical methodology and practice.

Prerequisites (if any): Comm A or equivalent.

War Reporting: Ethical Perspectives
Instructor: Lindsay Palmer
School of Journalism and Mass Communication 880 section 040; 3 cr; call number: 67401
Class meets: T 3:30 - 5:30pm
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for graduate students.

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar examines the labor of war reporting, applying the critical frameworks found in media and cultural studies. We will think carefully about the political, economic, and cultural elements of this precarious media production, looking at the interconnections between the conditions of labor in the practice of war reporting and the journalistic texts so often criticized by media scholars such as Des Freedman, Daya Thussu, Toby Miller, Douglas Kellner, Roger Stahl, and James Der Derian. While we will interrogate many of the mainstream news reports that take war as their topic, we will strive to maintain a nuanced approach to studying the production of these texts. Following this, we will explore a diverse array of topics that are highly relevant to war reporting: embodiment, gender, cultural difference, political economy, digitization, and biopolitics, just to name a few. In each seminar meeting, we will also attend to the question of transnational media ethics. If the field of media ethics seeks a set of “best practices” for transnational media production, then what are the “best practices” for war reporters? What are the best practices for their managing editors and news directors? Rather than taking an abstract philosophical approach to answering these ethical questions, we will draw upon concrete historical and material examples, rooting our approach to media ethics in the tradition of cultural studies.

Prerequisites: None.

World Regions in Global Context
Instructor: Rachel Boothby & Kramer Gillin
Geography 340; 3 cr; call number: 65323
Class meets: online only
There is no discussion section.
This course is suitable for undergraduate students.

This course is a survey of development and change within each of the world's regions (e.g., Africa, Southeast Asia). Attention is devoted to environment and society; history, economy, and demographic change; culture and politics; future challenges; key actors.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.