Humanitarian Intervention After 9/11

University of Wisconsin Law School, Room 2260

March 31, 2006

9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Organizer: Scott Straus


 

Symposium Presenters:

 

Gareth Evans, former Australian Foreign Minister and current President of the International Crisis Group.

 

Michel Feher, publisher and author of Powerless by Design: The Age of the International Community (Duke).

 

Jerry Fowler, Staff Director, Committee on Conscience, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

 

Jeremy I. Levitt, Professor at Florida International University College of Law and author of The Evolution of Deadly Conflict in Liberia: From ‘Paternaltarianism’ to State Collapse (Carolina Academic Press).

 

Jon Pevehouse, Associate Professor of Political Science, UW-Madison, and author of Democracy from Above: Regional Organizations and Democratization (Cambridge).

 

Fernando Tesón, Professor at Florida State University College of Law and author of numerous works on humanitarian intervention, including Humanitarian Intervention: An Inquiry into Law and Morality, 3rd Ed. (Transnational).

 

Ben Valentino, Assistant Professor of Government, Dartmouth College, and author of Final Solutions: The Causes of Mass Killing and Genocide (Cornell).

 

Thomas G. Weiss, Professor of Political Science and Director at the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York. He is also the author of numerous books, including most recently Sword & Salve: Confronting New Wars and Humanitarian Crises (Rowman and Littlefield).

 


 

Contact:  Scott Straus, Assistant Professor of Political Science, at sstraus@wisc.edu and Kristen Fricchione, WILJ Symposium Editor, at uwsymp@gmail.com for registration information and other questions.  This event is free and open to the public.

 

Sponsored by the Global Studies Program, the Global Legal Studies Initiative, the Humanitarianism and World Order Research Circle, and the Wisconsin International Law Journal

Co-sponsored by the African Studies Program and the Department of Political Science.

 

Approved for 5.5 CLE credits